Quantcast

Top US COVID Scientist Dead | Protestors Block Vaccine Site

PLUS: Protesters temporarily block LA vaccination site

CNN – Andrew Brooks, a research professor at Rutgers University who led the development of the first FDA-approved Covid-19 saliva test, died suddenly on January 23, according to a Rutgers statement.

His sister confirmed to CNN on Sunday that the cause of death was a heart attack.

Brooks, 51, was the chief operating officer and director of technology development at RUCDR Infinite Biologics, the lab that developed the saliva test.

The test, which was approved in April 2020, was authorized for at-home use a month later.

New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy referred to Brooks as “one of our state’s unsung heroes” in a January 25 news conference, saying his work “undoubtedly saved lives.”

...article continued below
- Advertisement -

Last year, Brooks spoke about the impact the saliva test had as an alternative to nasal PCR tests for health care workers.

Ciick source below to read more. 

Protesters temporarily block LA vaccination site

The Los Angeles Times reports that one of the largest vaccination sites in the nation was forced to temporarily shut down Saturday.

Dozen of protesters blocked the entrance, stalling hundreds of motorists who had been waiting in line for hours.

...article continued below
- Advertisement -

Officials say the Los Angeles Fire Department shut the entrance to the vaccination center at Dodger Stadium about 2 p.m. as a precaution.

The protesters had members of anti-vaccine and far-right groups.

Some of them carried signs decrying the COVID-19 vaccine and shouting for people not to get the shots. There were no incidents of violence.

STATE-BY-STATE: HERE’S WHAT ELSE IS HAPPENING IN COVID NEWS (AP):

PHOENIX — Arizona reported 5,119 coronavirus cases and 76 confirmed deaths on Saturday.

The Department of Health Services says the state’s pandemic totals increased to 753,379 cases and 13,098 confirmed deaths.

Cases, hospitalizations and deaths are slowing in Arizona. However, Arizona’s coronavirus diagnosis rate was the worst in the nation in the week ending Friday (1 in 178). South Carolina (1 in 192), Oklahoma (1 in 216) and Rhode Island (1 in 225) were next.

On Friday, the state announced that a potentially more contagious variant from Britain was confirmed in tests from three people.

The department says it is monitoring the situation and reiterated the need for people to wear masks and remain socially distance.

___

LOS ANGELES — California surpassed 40,000 coronavirus deaths as the state’s steepest surge of cases begins to taper.

The tally by Johns Hopkins University shows the state passed the milestone Saturday with 40,240 deaths. The deaths are surging at a record pace after recent declines in cases and hospitalizations. It took six months for California to record its first 10,000 deaths, then four months to double to 20,000.

In just five weeks, the state reached 30,000 and needed only 20 days to get to 40,000.

New York leads the U.S. with more than 43,000 confirmed deaths, followed by California, Texas at 36,000 and Florida at 26,000.

___

BALTIMORE — Baltimore public health officials are canceling some COVID-19 vaccination appointments scheduled for next week after overbooking hundreds of first-dose appointments.

The city health department did not specify how many appointments would be canceled, or why the overbooking happened, The Baltimore Sun reported.

The department issued a statement saying it was working to identify potential issues in the state’s scheduling system, and the possibility that links to second-dose appointments were shared via email or social media.

“We are working to confirm that this situation will not occur moving forward,” the statement read.

Officials said they are prioritizing giving second doses to people who have already gotten their first shot because of limited inventory.

Meanwhile, Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan announced Saturday that state health officials have confirmed a case of COVID-19 caused by the new variant of the virus that was first detected in South Africa.

___

SANTA FE, N.M. — New Mexico reported 752 additional known COVID-19 cases and 17 deaths on Saturday, increasing the state’s pandemic totals to 173,539 cases and 3,265 deaths.

The number of infections is thought to be far higher than reported because many people have not been tested, and studies suggest people can be infected with the virus without feeling sick.

The counties with the most additional cases were Bernalillo (255), Sandoval (70), Dona Ana (70), McKinley (54), San Juan (41) and Santa Fe (32).

The number of infections is thought to be far higher than reported because many people have not been tested, and studies suggest people can be infected with the virus without feeling sick.

New Mexico’s seven-day rolling average of daily new cases dropped in the past two weeks while the rolling average of daily deaths was nearly flat.

Santa Fe’s school superintendent announced Saturday that schools will reopen in a voluntary hybrid model on Feb. 22, two weeks after when state officials have said New Mexico school districts and charter schools can reopen.

The Feb. 22 date provides time to inspect schools and for teachers to set up their classrooms while giving families and staff at least two weeks notice Superintendent Veronica García said.

___

ANCHORAGE, Alaska — City officials in Alaska say multiple crew members on a seafood factory trawler in the Aleutian Islands have tested positive for COVID-19.

The Anchorage Daily News reported that the city of Unalaska said Friday that factory trawler Araho, owned by seafood company O’Hara Corporation, reported 20 of its 40 crew members tested positive.

City Manager Erin Reinders said a couple of crew members reported symptoms after the vessel arrived in Alaska from Seattle on Wednesday. Reinders said the city is developing a plan to coordinate care for infected crew members and determine what to do with the others.

___

BOSTON — Starting Monday, 500 vaccinations per day will be administered at Fenway Park. The goal is to reach as many as 1,250 eligible residents per day under Massachusetts’ vaccination plan.

The site at the home of the Boston Red Sox is expected to stay open through the start of baseball season in early April.

Appointments are open for those people under Phase 1 of the state’s vaccine distribution plan and those 75 and older, who will start getting shots on Monday as the rollout moves into Phase 2.

Health care workers started receiving the vaccine at Fenway this week. The state’s first mass vaccination site at Gillette Stadium – home of the New England Patriots — opened this month.

State officials aim to open more than 100 public vaccination sites throughout Massachusetts.

___

AUGUSTA, Maine — Some 2,400 businesses and people in Maine have been approved for more than $221 million in forgivable loans in the first two weeks of the reopening of the Paycheck Protection Program.

Those figures apply to loans between Jan. 11 and Jan. 24, according to U.S. Sen. Susan Collins, one of the politicians behind the program. The federal government provided $284.5 billion for the program in the most recent COVID-19 relief package.

Small businesses that employ 300 or fewer people and experienced a 25% or greater gross revenue loss because of the coronavirus are eligible to apply for a second forgivable loan under the program.

___

COLUMBIA, S.C. — South Carolina is reporting its first known case of the Britain-based variant of the coronavirus.

The Department of Health and Environmental Control says the agency was notified Friday that a sample from an adult in the Lowcountry “with an international travel history” had tested positive for the variant.

On Friday, 434 cases of the U.K. variant had been reported in the U.S.

This week, health officials reported the first two U.S. cases of a South African coronavirus variant in South Carolina.

Health experts say both variants possibly spread more easily and protective measures of wearing masks, social distancing and avoiding large gatherings are recommended.

___

HONOLULU — The Navy has announced about a dozen personnel assigned to a Pearl Harbor destroyer, now in San Diego, have tested positive for the coronavirus and were removed from the ship.

The Honolulu Star-Advertiser reported Cmdr. Sean Robertson says crew members aboard the USS Chafee who were in close contact with the infected sailors are off the ship and in quarantine while monitoring symptoms. None of the sailors have been hospitalized.

Robertson says there are plans to test all sailors abroad the vessel of 350 people.

___

RENO, Nevada — Nevada’s governor and attorney general are denouncing resolutions approved by five rural counties that attempt to defy state restrictions intended to slow the spread of the coronavirus statewide.

Gov. Steve Sisolak and Attorney General Aaron Ford say the resolutions passed by Lyon, White Pine, Eureka and Elko Counties have no force of law and cannot override the governor’s emergency directives.

They say the directives have been issued under state law and upheld in courts several times. The two Democrats say everyone is tired of the pandemic, but every day Nevadans die due to COVID-19 in rural counties and urban areas.

- Advertisement -
- Advertisement -

TRENDING

Pentagon Preps For Mandatory Vaccine Enforcement

WASHINGTON (AP) — Defense Secretary Lloyd Austin is vowing he "won't let grass grow under our feet" as the department begins to implement the...

Whistleblowers: Biden Admin Told Them to ‘Downplay’ COVID Outbreak in Migrant Facility

HEADLINE USA – Two whistleblowers who worked at a migrant detention facility in El Paso, Texas, said they were instructed by top Biden administration...

Kentucky Officials Vow to Resist Democrat Gov.’s Mask Decree

(Headline USA) Several Kentucky Republicans slammed Democrat Gov. Andy Beshear over a controversial mask requirement for state workers and announced that they would not...

Biden’s Mask Rules Are For You, Not For Him

PATRIOTIC VIRAL NEWS – The GOP War Room shares that while his administration pushes for mask mandates, President Joe Biden mingled with dozens of...

Tech Billionaire Plans Brain-Implanted Computer Chips

Neuralink has been seen to work in primates. In April, the company released a video of a macaque playing a videogame after having the chips implanted in its brain.

People Get This Wrong About HIPAA Privacy Rules

THE CONVERSATION – The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act’s Privacy Rule is a federal law prohibiting health care providers, businesses and the people...

Former Trump Health Official Urges Americans To Get Vaccinated

If you aren't vaccinated and haven't had COVID, you will get Delta variant: Brett Giroir

Top US Priest Caught Cruising Gay Bars, Exposing Catholic Culture War

(THE CONVERSATION) It had all the hallmarks of a sensationalist tabloid sting. On July 21, 2021, an article appeared alleging that a senior U.S. priest,...

Japan Expands Virus Emergency Amid Games

TOKYO (AP) — Japan expanded a coronavirus state of emergency to four more areas in addition to Tokyo on Friday following record spikes in...

People Of Faith Are Finally Embracing Vaccines

CHRISTIANITY TODAY – Americans with a faith are becoming increasingly accepting of the Covid-19 vaccine, research has found. The study by the Public Religion Research...
- Advertisement -