“Voluntary Quarantines” Are Bogus; Exposed Health Worker Parties On

Ken Gallager, CC BY-SA 3.0

Hours after we said that a “voluntary quarantine” is not a quarantine at all, an infected healthcare worker wants to party |

N.H. coronavirus patient breaks isolation, potentially exposing others

Most states have laws against breaking an isolation order.

March 3, 2020

NBC News – The first coronavirus patient in New Hampshire — an employee of Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center — defied instructions from public health officials to stay away from other people.

In a statement, the state Department of Health and Human Services said the patient attended an invitation-only private event Friday “despite having been directed to self-isolate.”

The action prompted the state to issue “an official order of isolation to the first patient.”

Most states have such rules. And breaking the rules may be punishable, depending on the state.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says states have “police power functions to protect the health, safety, and welfare of persons within their borders.” Read more. 

Coronavirus Update: Second Person Tests Positive For Virus In N.H.

March 3, 2020

New Hampshire Public Radio – State health officials have announced a second presumptive positive test result for the coronavirus disease in New Hampshire.

The patient is an adult male from Grafton County who had close contact with the the first person to test positive in New Hampshire, who also lives in Grafton County. He is currently isolated at home.

Both individuals are employees of Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center in Lebanon.

State health officials say they expect additional cases may be identified as they try to figure out other people that first person came into contact with.

The state says the first person identified with COVID-19, the disease caused by the new coronavirus, attended a social event last Friday despite being asked to self-quarantine.

The first patient is now being ordered to isolate under state law.

The state is contacting attendees who had close contact with the person during the event and asking them to follow the recommended 14-day self-isolation.

DHMC has identified staff who may have been exposed through close contact but is not aware of any exposure to patients in clinical areas, according to a state press release. Read more.