Unhinged Trump Like “Mad King George”: Aides

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BUSINESS INSIDER – Trump administration officials and allies are comparing President Donald Trump to “Mad King George” in his final days in office, The Washington Post reports.

Aides described his conduct as that of “a total monster” and the violent circumstances in Washington that Trump caused as “insane” and “beyond the pale.”

Trump played a significant role in instigating his supporters to mount a violent insurrection on Capitol Hill on Wednesday that forced Congress to evacuate and resulted in multiple injuries and deaths.

Trump administration officials and allies are comparing President Donald Trump to “mad King George” in his final days in office as Washington grapples with the aftermath of the violent insurrection on Capitol Hill that Trump helped instigate.

Trump described as “a total monster”

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Aides described his conduct to The Washington Post as that of “a total monster” and the violent circumstances in Washington that Trump caused as “insane” and “beyond the pale … “

For Sen. Majority Leader Mitch McConnell’s part, the Post reported that he doesn’t plan to speak to Trump ever again.

Trump also got into a “screaming match” with House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy on Wednesday, Punchbowl News reported.

King George, mad as a hatter*

King George III, who reigned England from 1760 to 1820, lost the American Revolutionary War to British colonialists who left England and founded colonies in what is now the United States.

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He “spent his last decade in a fog of insanity and blindness,” according to the History Channel, over what historians believe was severe mental illness.

Click source below to read more. 

* “Mad as a hatter” is a colloquial English phrase used in conversation to suggest (lightheartedly) that a person is suffering from insanity. It is believed to emanate from Luton, Bedfordshire, in eastern England, where men in the area worked predominantly in the hattery business, which used mercury in the hat making process. The accumulation of mercury in the body causes symptoms similar to madness. 

 

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