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COVID-19 Vaccinations Work With Or Without Side Effects

Many people assume that when a person experiences side effects after COVID-19 vaccination, it is a sign that the vaccine is working ...

MEDICAL NEWS TODAY – While many assume that side effects from a COVID-19 vaccine mean that the shot is working, researchers at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore state that people should not interpret the symptoms that way.

The researchers found that whether one experienced side effects or not, the vaccines worked exceedingly well at generating a strong immune response.

Overall, 99.9% of the study participants successfully developed antibodies for fighting SARS-CoV-2 infection.

All data and statistics are based on publicly available data at the time of publication. Some information may be out of date. Visit our coronavirus hub and follow our live updates page for the most recent information on the COVID-19 pandemic.

Many people assume that when a person experiences side effects after COVID-19 vaccination, it is a sign that the vaccine is working.

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This may leave people without such symptoms wondering whether their vaccinations have been successful. According to a new research letter from scientists at Johns Hopkins Medicine, this is not a valid concern.

The Johns Hopkins research confirmed that the Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna vaccines are exceedingly effective at generating a strong antibody response regardless of whether a person develops side effects or not.

The letter’s senior author Dr. Aaron Milstone, associate hospital epidemiologist at Johns Hopkins Hospital, explains:

“It wasn’t known if a lack of symptoms following vaccination or prior SARS-CoV-2 infection would indicate a less-than-adequate antibody response in people who received either the [Pfizer-BioNTech] or Moderna vaccines, so we studied an available group of staff from our hospital to see if there were any connections.”

There were none. In the study, 99.9% of all the participants successfully developed the antibodies the vaccines are designed to promote.

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The research letter appears in the journal JAMA Internal MedicineTrusted Source … READ MORE.

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