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BRAIN HEALTH

Alzheimer’s Accidentally Spread to Several Humans via Corpse Transplants

NEWSWEEK – Five people may have "caught" Alzheimer's after receiving growth hormone from human cadavers during childhood. Between 1959 and 1985, over 1,800 patients in the U.K. were treated with human growth hormone extracted from the pituitary glands of dead bodies. The hormone, which is synthetically produced today, was mostly administered to children to treat severe short stature, often caused by a deficiency of this hormone. In 1985, one of these patients died from a rare brain...

Irregular Sleep Patterns Increase Dementia Risk. Doctor Explains

Dr. Puja Uppal, Family Medicine: "We understand that good sleep does a mind and body good. It's time to practice it! "This new research continues to validate that people with very irregular sleep patterns might face a higher risk of developing dementia compared to those with more consistent sleep schedules. "Now, this doesn't mean that irregular sleep patterns and schedules are directly causing dementia--but there's a noticeable connection. "This suggests focusing on avoiding highly irregular sleep patterns...

Could Owning A Cat Make You More Susceptible To Schizophrenia? Study Says Yes

"We found that individuals exposed to cats had approximately twice the odds of developing schizophrenia," wrote the research team.

Calculate Your Brain Care Score; Why It Matters

Key Takeaways Investigators have developed a Brain Care Score composed of physical, lifestyle, and social-emotional components, with a higher score indicating better brain care In a recent study, adults with a higher Brain Care Score had a lower risk of developing dementia and stroke as they aged. BOSTON – Individuals can improve their brain care and reduce their risk of developing brain diseases such as dementia and stroke by focusing on a list of 12...

Pain, fatigue, fuzzy thinking: How long COVID disrupts the brain

Michelle Wilson got COVID earlier in the pandemic, before vaccines were available.

Eating strawberries may fight off dementia in overweight adults

INTERESTING ENGINEERING – According to a recent study, strawberries may help deter the emergence of dementia in adults with weight issues. The research found that 30 middle-aged overweight adults who self-reported having modest cognitive loss experienced fewer memory issues and fewer depressive symptoms after eating strawberries every day for just 12 weeks. The work followed five men and 25 women in a double-blind, randomized controlled trial that saw one group consume a strawberry-based powder and another...

In Biden’s Defense, He’s Obviously Senile

(Luis Cornelio, Headline USA) President Joe Biden faced scrutiny on Monday after recounting a fabricated Amtrak conductor incident where he was supposedly hailed with the words, “Joey, baby!” Despite never experiencing such an event, Biden reiterated his claim during a Delaware-based event, adding to the tally of his 12 known false claims since assuming the presidency, as reported by the New York Post. Biden’s tale centered around his purported interaction with the Amtrak conductor, Angelo, during...

Largest study of brains of athletes younger than 30 finds early signs of CTE even in amateur players

CTV NEWS – A new study from Boston University’s CTE Center has discovered more than 60 cases of chronic traumatic encephalopathy, known as CTE, in athletes who were under the age of 30 at the time of their death. Researchers found about 40 per cent of the brains studied had developed some of the earliest signs of the disease, which is associated with repeated head trauma. The study also includes what researchers believe to be the...

New dementia risk score helps identify people at risk

Department of Psychiatry, Warneford Hospital, Oxford, UK – A new dementia risk score, which draws on 11 mostly modifiable risk factors, identifies people at risk - from mid-life onwards - of developing the disease within the next 14 years, suggests a large long term study published in the open access journal BMJ Mental Health. The UK Biobank Dementia Risk Score, or UKBDRS for short, outperformed three other widely used risk scores originally developed in Australia...

Chronic back pain isn’t influenced by ‘good’ posture. The brain plays a bigger role than expected, experts say

Australian Broadcasting Corporation – For a huge number of people, chronic back pain – which is typically defined as back pain that lasts longer than three months– is a distressing part of daily life. It also has a big impact on the economy. In 2018, consulting firm Deloitte reported that chronic musculoskeletal pain cost Australia's health system over $1 billion. But while back pain rates are estimated to grow, there's disagreement over the cause and best treatment for the...

Low sexual satisfaction linked to memory decline later in life: study

Low sexual satisfaction in middle age could be linked to future memory decline, according to a new study.

How Sleep Impacts Mental Health

MDPI Blog– Sleep has a huge influence on our physical and mental health. Insufficient sleep is related to many chronic health problems, including heart disease, depression, diabetes, stress, and much more. Not only this, but oversleeping has also been shown to negatively affect health or at least be a symptom of poor health. It’s a difficult balance to strike. Most research suggests that between 7 and 9 hours is optimal. With insomnia affecting around 6-10% of the...

Heavy Cannabis Use Linked to Schizophrenia Especially among Young Men

SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN – The French psychiatrist Jacques-Joseph Moreau published a book called Hashish and Mental Illness in 1845, the same year that Scientific American brought out its first issue. In it, he explored his own experiences with the drug cannabis at the Paris-based Club des Hachichins—some of which took place alongside the likes of Victor Hugo, Honoré de Balzac and Charles Baudelaire. Two years earlier Moreau described the “undescribable delights” of a “marvelous substance.” But in his...

Eye Changes May Reveal Early Signs of Alzheimer’s Disease

EVERYDAY HEALTH – Today, Alzheimer’s disease (AD) can only be definitely diagnosed after a person dies. But new research suggests the possibility of much earlier diagnosis with a simpler, less invasive method: eye exams. In a recent in-depth analysis, research published in the journal Acta Neuropathologica details how changes in the retina correspond to brain and cognitive changes in Alzheimer’s disease patients. “These findings may lead to the development of imaging techniques that would be able...
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