Is that salmon really wild? We have the answer.

(HEADLINE HEALTH) We have fabulous news for every consumer who wants food from nature, not from chem labs and factories.

“If the chicken that laid the egg they’re scrambling for breakfast had a name, best friend, or gluten sensitivity, they want to read about it.” – Food Dive on heightened consumer interest in where our food comes from. PHOTO: Steven Lilley

It seems that so many of us are insisting on knowing where our food comes from that the food industry is taking bold measures to provide reliable answers.

This is even good news for those who may be a bit too timid to ask.

Because the industry now admits that ‘there is no detail about a product or animal that consumers don’t want to know about.’

That means that retailers and chefs are accustomed to being asked, and are ready and willing to provide answers.

Want to know if the fish of the day is wild or farm raised? Ask your clerk or server.

We have many more details below for every consumer who wants to know what they’re putting into their bodies – which should be all of us.

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Is grocery store salmon really wild? We have the answer

(Erika Kincaid, FoodDive.com) A new certification system offers consumers, retailers, and restaurants a way to track a fish’s history, from the ocean to the plate, according to Fortune.

Fish are tagged with a QR code when they’re caught, and information about them is logged into the system. Along the way from fishing net to market, information on the fish’s journey is added.

The technology is considered tamper-proof, but does allow participants to choose what they want to upload and how they want the product tracked.

It would appear that there is no detail about a product or animal that consumers don’t want to know about.

If the chicken that laid the egg they’re scrambling for breakfast had a name, best friend, or gluten sensitivity, they want to read about it.

As food companies try to meet consumers’ voracious demand for traceability, blockchain technology, as it’s called, may become increasingly applicable, albeit expensive.

Wal-Mart tested out a new traceability initiative using blockchain technology in 2017 with encouraging results. The supermarket giant tracked pork in China and mangoes in the U.S., establishing a digital history for each product. This success will likely translate into broader use of this technology for the super store.

Smaller startups are testing out traceability systems, and marketing them as a reason to trust and buy their product. Freeze-dried fruit company Crunchies recently introduced a new traceability platform, which allows consumers to see where the fruit from their individual bags of blueberries or strawberries originated.

Consumer response to these new tracking systems has been overwhelmingly positive, as recent studies find that transparency is of the utmost importance. Read the full story at Food Dive. Read this next: Immunity-Boosting Foods for Cold & Flu Season