Rep.-Elect Links Vaccines To Autism

Image: Screenshot, Esquire

Rep.-elect, who’s also a doctor, falsely links vaccines to autism at town hall

Washington (CNN) Rep.-elect Mark Green (R-Tenn.), who is also a doctor, falsely claimed at a town hall Tuesday that a rise in autism cases could be linked to preservatives in vaccines, according to a video posted by The Tennessean.

The video shows Green saying he’ll confront the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention about autism and vaccines.

“Let me say this about autism,” Green said. “I have committed to people in my community, up in Montgomery County, to stand on the CDC’s desk and get the real data on vaccines. Because there is some concern that the rise in autism is the result of the preservatives that are in our vaccines.”

However, Green said after the video was published Wednesday that his comments are being “misconstrued.”

“Recent comments I made at a town hall regarding vaccines has been misconstrued. I want to reiterate my wife and I vaccinated our children, and we believe, and advise others they should have their children vaccinated,” Green said in a statement to CNN.

But, in separate comments to The Tennessean, Green appeared to reiterate his previous comments, but adding that vaccines are “essential to good population health.”

The alleged correlation between vaccines and autism has been widely debunked, and has been called out by the advocacy group Autism Speaks, which previously said, “Over the last two decades, extensive research has asked whether there is any link between childhood vaccinations and autism. The results of this research are clear: Vaccines do not cause autism.” Autism’s Real Cause, According to Science

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American Politics Is Full of Medical Doctors With Insane Ideas

The latest is Tennessee’s Mark Green.

Esquire – Some day, an academic historian will write the definitive history of how, in the late 20th and early 21st centuries, American politics became so thick with medical doctors who ascribe to crazy ideas.

First among them, of course, will be former Congressman Paul Broun of Georgia, who told a local sportsmen’s banquet back home that everything he’d learned in medical school was a tool of the devil in one way or another.

It turns out that we have a new entry in that lengthy calendar of wingnut Asclepii. From The Tennessean in Nashville:

Not only did Republican Mark Green, a Congressman-elect from Clarksville who is also a medical doctor, express hesitation about the CDC’s stance on vaccines, Green said he believed the federal health agency has “fraudulently managed” the data. His remarks came in response to an audience question at a town hall meeting in Franklin from a woman identifying herself as the parent of a young adult with autism. The woman was concerned about possible cuts to Medicaid funding.

“Let me say this about autism,” Green said. “I have committed to people in my community, up in Montgomery County, to stand on the CDC’s desk and get the real data on vaccines. Because there is some concern that the rise in autism is the result of the preservatives that are in our vaccines…As a physician, I can make that argument and I can look at it academically and make the argument against the CDC, if they really want to engage me on it.” Autism/Vaccine Talk Lives-On On Social Media

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