Most Doctors Say Obamacare Has Helped

Image: healthaffairs.org | Fair Use

“A majority of respondents (60 percent) believed that the ACA had improved access to care and insurance, yet many (43 percent) felt that it had reduced the affordability of coverage.” 

Sept. 6 (UPI) — Most doctors think Obamacare has helped patients get better healthcare, even as a lengthy court battle threatens to strike down the law, new findings show.

Roughly 20 million people in the United States got coverage through the Affordable Care Act once the law was passed in 2012.

“A slight majority of U.S. physicians, after experiencing the ACA’s implementation, believed that it is a net positive for U.S. health care,” the authors wrote.

The study included 489 responses from 1,200 physicians surveyed in 2017.

About 53 percent of doctors thought the Affordable Care Act “would turn healthcare in the right direction” five years following its launch. That’s compared to 42 percent in 2012.

Overall, states that expanded Medicaid options to cover the Affordable Care Act had four fewer heart disease deaths per 100,000 people compared to states that didn’t expand … Read more. 

US Physicians’ Reactions To ACA Implementation, 2012–17

“Political party affiliation was a significant predictor of support for the ACA”

HEALTH AFFAIRS  VOL. 38, NO. 9 | SEPTEMBER 2019

This study was supported by the Small Grants Program of the Mayo Clinic’s Division of General Internal Medicine and by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences

Health Affairs – Physicians play a key role in implementing health policy, and US physicians were split in their opinions about the Affordable Care Act (ACA) soon after its implementation began.

We readministered elements of a prior survey of US physicians to a similar sample to understand how US physicians’ opinions of the ACA may have changed over a crucial five-year implementation period (2012–17), and we compared responses across both surveys.

Of the 1,200 physicians to whom we sent a survey in the summer of 2017, 489 responded (a response rate of 41 percent).

A majority of respondents (60 percent) believed that the ACA had improved access to care and insurance, yet many (43 percent) felt that it had reduced the affordability of coverage.

More physicians agreed in 2017 than in 2012 that the ACA “would turn United States health care in the right direction” (53 percent versus 42 percent), despite reporting perceived worsening in several practice conditions over the same time period.

After we adjusted for specialty, political party affiliation, practice setting type, perceived social responsibility, age, and sex, we found that only political party affiliation was a significant predictor of support for the ACA in the 2017 results. Source. 

RECENTLY: 

Federal Court Poised To Kill Obamacare

Primary Care Doctors Shutting Offices, Moving To Walmart

Doctor Explains: How Insurance Impacts The Way Physicians Treat You