Medical Marijuana a Hit With Seniors

“I was on Percocet and replaced it with medical marijuana.”

(WebMD) Seniors are giving rave reviews for medical marijuana.

In a new survey, those who turned to it for treating chronic pain reported it reduced pain and decreased the need for opioid painkillers.

Nine out of 10 liked it so much they said they’d recommend medical pot to others.

“I was on Percocet and replaced it with medical marijuana. Thank you, thank you, thank you,” said one senior.

Another patient said: “It is extremely effective and has allowed me to function in my work and life again. It has not completely taken away the pain, but allows me to manage it.”

Study co-author Dr. Diana Martins-Welch said, “The impact of medical marijuana was overwhelmingly positive. Medical marijuana led them to taking less medications overall — opioids and non-opioids — and they had better function and better quality of life.”

The biggest complaint the researchers heard about medical marijuana was the cost. “It’s an out-of-pocket expense. Insurance doesn’t cover it because it’s federally illegal,” Martins-Welch explained.

As for unwelcome side effects, Martins-Welch said sedation was what she heard about the most. “A lot of people don’t like feeling sleepy,” she said.

It’s also important to work with your doctor to find the right dose, since pain experts say that too little or too much doesn’t ease pain.

Thirty-one states have some type of medical marijuana law on the books.

“Every state has its own laws, like what a qualifying condition is. There are a lot of differences. And you can’t take a product from one state and cross another state line,” Martins-Welch said.

According to federal law, medical marijuana is still illegal. “There are legal fears. Some practitioners worry that the DEA might come after them,” she added.

Medical marijuana is different than just picking up some pot and smoking it. Full story by Serena Gordon, HealthDay News.