Driver Swerves To Avoid Deer, Guilty Of Manslaughter

Slow down at these times of day to avoid deer crashes 

| Headline Health – It’s not just hunters and hikers whose health and lives may be on the line when deer are on the run.

Highway collisions involving wildlife injure 29,000 motorists per year, killing 200.

And in some cases, law enforcement is taking the position that it’s not the animal that’s at fault.

Earlier this week, a 28-year-old Ohio woman was convicted of vehicular manslaughter for the death of a 61-year-old motorist earlier this year.

The younger woman was driving west on a state road when she entered the eastbound lane to avoid a deer, according to the county prosecutor. She faces up to 90 days in jail; the charge is a second-degree misdemeanor.

Further details below from local media …

Deer on the move causing more crashes

GateHouse Media, Ohio – Nov 2, 2018 – For deer, it’s the season of love.

It’s also the season of injury and death.

And in recent weeks, more of them have been meandering out onto Ohio’s highways posing problems for drivers.

Dispatchers with the Ohio Highway Patrol’s Canton post said Monday troopers responded to three deer/vehicle crashes on the same day last week.

“This is our peak deer/vehicle accident time of the year”

“We’ve handled 127 deer crashes this year, but we’re starting to see an increase because of the time of year,” said Lt. Leo Shirkey of the Ohio Highway Patrol’s Canton post.

Earlier this week, a 28-year-old Carrollton woman was convicted of vehicular manslaughter for the Feb. 8 death of a 61-year-old Magnolia area woman in Carroll County.

The younger woman was driving west on Route 171 when she entered the eastbound lane to avoid a deer, according to a statement from the Carroll County Prosecutor’s Office.

She struck the vehicle driven by the older woman, who later died.

That crash happened in February. But more deer typically wander out or dart into traffic during the rutting season, which wildlife officials say is currently in full swing.

“This is also our peak vehicle accident time of the year,” said Scott Peters, wildlife management supervisor for the Ohio Department of Natural Resources Division of Wildlife. “It’s rutting season. Getting into late October and into the first two weeks of November, that is prime deer breeding time. The deer are just starting to move.”

Officials say more deer are finding their way onto the pavement — or darting across, despite oncoming traffic — between 6 and 8 a.m. and between 6 and 8 p.m. on any given day.

They recommend drivers be extra vigilant during those time periods.

Deer still have learned the rules of the road

Statewide, there have been 2,670 deer/vehicle crashes between Sept. 1 and Wednesday, according to Ohio Department of Safety records. That is down from 3,797 during the same reporting period as last year.

While the number of deer-involved crashes is down, that doesn’t mean deer have learned the rules of the road … Read more. 

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