Doctors Who Disappeared Without A Trace

Did your doctor close up shop without saying a word? This could be the reason

| Exposing yet another medical industry practice that’s bad for patient care

The New York Times – When Don Cue developed a bladder infection last fall, he called his longtime urologist’s office for a urine culture and antibiotics.

It was a familiar routine for the two-time prostate cancer survivor; infections were not uncommon since he began using a catheter that connects to his bladder through an incision in his abdomen.

When Mr. Cue called this time, a receptionist told him that his physician, Dr. Mark Kellerman, no longer worked at the Iowa Clinic in Des Moines, a large multi-specialty group. She refused to divulge where he had gone.

“As a patient, ‘scared’ is too strong a word, but my feeling is, ‘What do I do now?’” said Mr. Cue, 58.

Flummoxed, he solved his immediate problem by taking leftover antibiotics he had in his medicine cabinet.

It was only later that he learned his doctor had been fired by the Iowa Clinic and planned to start a urology practice with clinic colleagues.

And, under the terms of their contract with their former employer, the doctors were banned for a year from practicing within 35 miles of the clinic, and from recruiting former patients to follow them.

Contracts with so-called restrictive covenants are now common in medicine, although some states limit their use.

Noncompete clauses — common in many commercial sectors — aim to stop physicians and other health care professionals from taking patients with them if they move to a competing practice nearby or start their own.

But what may be good for business can be bad for patient care — and certainly disquieting for those whose doctors seem to simply disappear.

One survey of nearly 2,000 primary care physicians in five states found that roughly 45 percent were bound by such clauses.

Continuity of care is important, doctors say, especially for patients with ongoing medical issues. Cutting off access to a doctor is different from disrupting someone’s relationship with a favorite hairstylist or money manager, they say. Read more. 

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