Dementia Risk Higher For Overweight Middle-aged People

“Our lifestyle in midlife can have a particularly strong impact on our brain health in later life.” 

(Belfast Telegraph) Middle-aged people who are overweight have an increased risk of dementia, a new analysis has found.

Researchers suggest that maintaining a health weight in midlife reduces that chances of dementia years later.

The research, based on 39 studies across Europe, the United States and Asia, looked at the health of more than 1.3 million adults.

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It concluded that people who were diagnosed with dementia generally had a higher Body Mass Index (BMI) in midlife, but a lower one in old age.

Body Mass Index is a measure taking into account a person’s height and weight.  

A healthyBody Mass Index is in the 18.5 to 24.9 range.

Twenty-five to 29.9 means someone is overweight, while 30 or above means someone is obese.

Dr Rosa Sancho, from the charity Alzheimer’s Research UK, said:

“This large study links a higher BMI with an increased risk of dementia later in life.

“We know that diseases that cause dementia get under way in the brain many years before symptoms start to show, so our lifestyle in midlife can have a particularly strong impact on our brain health in later life. Full story: Belfast Telegraph.

Also of interest: Celebrity Deaths Put Focus on Early Onset Dementia

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