Psychotherapist Was Actually A Prostitute: Cops

Psychotherapist Johanna Lee Lamm, 43, is accused of repeatedly taking sexual advantage of her client. And charging him $200 per sex session. FACEBOOK

Toronto Sun – Johanna Lee Lamm got inside her patient’s head — and allegedly his pants.

According to police, the Minnesota psychotherapist claimed she had been raped by one of her clients.

[According to an internet business listing, “JOHANNA LEE LAMM is licensed to provide medical treatment under their counseling credentials, PSY.D, L.P.. (Doctor of Psychology, Licensed Psychologist)”]

Now, investigators say Lamm, 43, has been arrested for third-degree sexual conduct after learning she was allegedly having sex with the client and charging him $200 a pop.

Lamm initially reported the unidentified victim sexually assaulted her.

She later recanted her claim and admitted their four-month sexual relationship was consensual.

The criminal complaint alleges “sexual penetration occurred during the psychotherapy session.”

Lamm is being held on a $100,000 bond … Read more. 

Prostitutes posing as therapists and counselors: An ongoing public health problem … 

Therapist convicted for sexual relationship with a patient

The state of Wisconsin revoked counselor Kristin Marchese’s license after she was convicted of having sex with paying client.

Nov 20, 2014

KENOSHA (WITI) — To say that Kristin Marchese failed to respect professional boundaries with a patient is indisputable. To assume she should have known better is an understatement.

“There are laws in place for a reason,” said Tracey Braun, Kenosha County Assistant District Attorney, during a November 13th sentencing hearing.

The reason is people like Mark Huckeby. He was a truck driver until his semi jackknifed on a St. Louis area freeway in 2009.

He lost his job, started drinking heavily, became depressed, and wanted to die.

And that’s when he met Marchese — his new therapist at Oakwood Clinical Associates in Kenosha.

“She has a New York accent that — I’m not going to lie — turned me on,” Huckeby said in a telephone interview with the FOX6 Investigators.

He spoke on a patient phone inside Winnebago Mental Health Institute, where his now ex-wife, Tracy Ptak, says he’s been committed for weeks.

“He has never been as bad as he is,” Ptak said.

When Huckeby first start started therapy with Marchese, he told her all about his lifelong battle with mental illness, from bipolar disorder to PTSD. In fact, he told her everything. And, as any good therapist would, Marchese listened.

Mark Huckeby and Kristin Marchese engaged in a sexual relationship that started after Huckeby was referred to Marchese for clinical therapy.

“It’s a very intimate relationship,” said Stephen Saunders, who is director of graduate studies in the Department of Psychology at Marquette University. Read more. 

Sex Between Psychotherapists and Their Patients Is Well Documented 

Academic Press – Sex between therapists and clients has emerged as a significant phenomenon, one that the profession has not adequately acknowledged or addressed.

Extensive research has led to recognition of the extensive harm that therapist-client sex can produce.

Nevertheless, research suggests that perpetrators account for about 4.4% of therapists (7% of male therapists; 1.5% of female therapists) when data from national studies are pooled …

When people are hurting, unhappy, frightened, or confused, they may seek help from a therapist.

They may be depressed, perhaps thinking of killing themselves. They may be unhappy in their work or relationships, and not know how to bring about change.

They may be suffering trauma from rape, incest, or domestic violence. They may be bingeing and purging, abusing drugs and alcohol, or engaging in other behaviors that can destroy health and sometimes be fatal.

The therapeutic relationship is a special one, characterized by exceptional vulnerability and trust. People may talk to their therapists about thoughts, feelings, events, and behaviors that they would never disclose to anyone else.

Every state in the United States has recognized the special nature of the therapeutic relationship and the special responsibilities that therapists have in relation to their clients by requiring special training and licensure for therapists, and by recognizing a therapist-patient privilege which safeguards the privacy of what patients talk about to their therapist.

A relatively small minority of therapists take advantage of the client’s trust and vulnerability and of the power inherent in the therapist’s role by sexually exploiting the client. Each state has prohibited this abuse of trust, vulnerability, and power through licensing regulations.

Therapist-patient sex is also subject to civil law as a tort (i.e., offenders may be sued for malpractice), and some states have criminalized the offense.

The ethics codes of all major mental health professionals prohibit the offense … Read more. 

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